Dengue

Dengue fever is transmitted by the bite of an Aedes mosquito infected with a dengue virus. The mosquito becomes infected when it bites a person with dengue virus in their blood. It can’t be spread directly from one person to another person. This mosquito also transmits chikungunya, yellow fever and Zika infection. The Aedes aegypti mosquito lives in urban habitats and breeds mostly in man-made containers. Unlike other mosquitoes Ae. aegypti is a day-time feeder; its peak biting periods are early in the morning and in the evening before dusk. Female Ae. aegypti bites multiple people during each feeding period.

Symptoms

Symptoms, which usually begin four to six days after infection and last for up to 10 days, may include Sudden, high fever Severe headaches Pain behind the eyes Severe joint and muscle pain Fatigue Nausea Vomiting Skin rash, which appears two to five days after the onset of fever Mild bleeding (such a nose bleed, bleeding gums, or easy bruising These include
dengue hemorrhagic fever,
a rare complication characterized by high fever,
damage to lymph and blood vessels,
bleeding from the nose and gums,
enlargement of the liver,
and failure of the circulatory system. The symptoms may progress to massive bleeding, shock, and death. This is called dengue shock syndrome (DSS)

Treatments

There is no specific treatment for dengue fever. If you think you may have dengue fever, you should use pain relievers with acetaminophen and avoid medicines with aspirin, which could worsen bleeding. Maintenance of the patient's body fluid volume is critical to severe dengue care. You should also rest, drink plenty of fluids, and see your doctor.